Modern Art before Modern Art.

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gerda-kay:

Eugène Verneau, Papier de garde.
source
1910-again:

Gerardo Dottori, Explosion of Red on Green 1910
1910-again:

Michel Larionov, Nocturne c.1913
centuriespast:

Confederate Bills
John Haberle (1853-1933)
ca. 1890
Oil on board
Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts
splattergut:

JOHN BEASLEY GREENE (1832-1856) EGYPTE, TOMBEAU EXHUMÉ, ANNÉES 1850 <><><>
lilacsinthedooryard:

Paul Klee
Monument on the Border of the Fertile Country, 1929
centuriespast:

A New Variety, Try One
De Scott Evans (1847-1898)
1887-90
Oil on canvas
Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts
arsvitaest:

Charles Spencelayh (1865–1958), Burning Zeppelin (Cuffley) Sept 3rd 1916, oil on canvasboard 
Thanks to anotherword and blastedheath
1910-again:

Mikail Matyushi, Non Objectivity- Crystallization in Space 1915

*Mikhail Matyushin
likeafieldmouse:

Robert Fludd
Detail of the “Black Page” from Utriusque Cosmi Maioris Scilicet et Minoris Metaphysica, Physica Atque Technica Historia (1617)
"Black has repeatedly been associated with solid and geometric forms. The best known example dates back to the early seventeenth century in a page within volume one of Robert Fludd’s Utriusque Cosmi Maioris Scilicet et Minoris Metaphysica. 
The image – a black square – is presented in the context of a metaphysical iconography of the infinite. 
Each of the four sides of the square (slightly distorted so that it looks more like a rhombus) is marked with the same words: Et sic in infinitum. 
For Fludd, this image was nothing less than a representation of the prima materia, the beginning of all creation.”